Is it worth the pain?

Abuja, the federal capital of Nigeria has a large number of illegal structures which shelter homes and businesses. Some of these structures were built on flood plains, over high voltage lines, on sewage disposal lines, waterways, green-areas and at locations preventing expansion of major road networks to decongest traffic. Lives and property are at risk and some of the inhabitants are unaware of the looming danger. The public, government and planning authorities each had roles to play in creating the problem. The cost of demolition, resettlement and compensation liable is very high in cases where it was due to the planning authorities’ negligence that the structure was erected, this cost exceeds the estimated combined value of loss of life and property in case of a natural disaster. It is up to the new administration and the council engineers to determine whether or not to bring down all the illegal structures, take a selective approach as their predecessors in office have done due to financial constraints and social pressure or continue to ignore the problem and allow nature to take its course in due time.( Breach Of Abuja Master Plan). This issue is far from black and white and both sides present strong arguments.

For demolition of illegal structures and settlements

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The Federal Capital Development Authority’s mandate is to “To oversee the Infrastructural and Physical Development (Planning, Design and Construction) of the new Federal Capital; ensuring that it conforms to and surpasses the standards of new Capital Cities around the world; also paying special attention to Inclusivity, Functionality, Design and Aesthetics.”

Some stakeholders are of the opinion that these illegal structures should be brought down due to several factors which include; Environmental factors: With the increasing number of illegal structures, waste management has become a major challenge, improper waste disposal has many negative impacts on not only the residents occupying these illegal structure but on the surrounding community. Air pollution is also prevalent as a result of blockage of drainage systems and carbon monoxide emissions from the private generators as some of these structures are not connected to the national grid.

As a consequence of the improper waste management, public defecation, air pollution and water pollution, the health of residents of the community at large is at risk. The population density is increased which increases the pressure on scarce social amenities. These conditions nourished a background for epidemic outbreaks, such as Cholera, to happen. Furthermore, another major concern is the security of lives and properties. The law enforcement agencies find it more than difficult to control the area. The lack of law enforcement and the booming population, led to a large increase of crime rate. Armed gangs, illegal businesses, like prostitution and drug dealing, as well as riots and rapes, are happening more and more often.

Last but not least, these structures bring financial implications for the government. These eyesore buildings affect not only tourism of the country, but also investors become skeptical about investing in these high-risk areas. This in turn contributes to the high rate of unemployment and affects the potential growth and development of the city.

Against demolition of illegal structures and settlements

Picture2From a different point of view, past demolitions in Abuja have rendered over 800,000 people homeless. Some analysts have argued that shelter is both a human need and basic right and the Federal Capital Development Authority have violated international, regional and local instruments which they are parties to, such as the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights. Where demolition of human settlements occurs without due process, it is regarded as forced eviction or enforced homelessness and violates the prohibition against cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment.  Also in the international human rights law, corroborated by the African Charter, evictions can only be seen as lawful if they are considered to be necessary mainly in “exceptional circumstances.” When such “exceptional circumstances” are proven to be real and not mere speculations, due process has to be followed which includes States are in obligation to ensure before evictions that all possible alternatives are worked out together with the persons affected. This includes the provision of alternative resettlement plan and compensation for the affected persons, a key missing link in all the demolitions that have taken place till date in Abuja.

Likely fallout from these demolitions is an upsurge in crime rates in the affected areas further escalating the fragile security experienced in the country. The Nigerian state is battling with a terrorist group in three of its six geopolitical zones, the North-West, North-Central and North-East. Kidnapping and armed robbery are not uncommon in the South-East and South-South, while armed robbery is prevalent in the South western part of the country.  These demolitions are likely to compound the insecurity in the country as the affected persons see themselves as victims of society and thus will not hesitate to resort to violence and criminality.

Another implication of these demolitions will be an upsurge in commercial sex work, exploitation and trafficking with an attendant increase in the incidence of sexual transmitted disease (STDs) and HIV/ AIDS.

Thousands of children are also likely to drop out of school due to the displacements and the demolition of their schools.

With this brief about the demolition exercise in Abuja, what are your thoughts? Is it worth the pain?

1: 

Alshammari Abdulrahman

Duan Shangzhou

Anna Georgiadou 

Dambatta Shetima

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50 thoughts on “Is it worth the pain?

  1. i believe that these illegal buildings should be demolished because they are built on areas not suitable for construction, even if they were not to be demolished buildings constructed on flood plains or around high voltage lines is very hazardous and can lead to the destruction of life. i also believe the government should should compensate people who’s homes where demolished because right from the start it was due to the negligence that these houses were constructed in the first place.

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  2. Interesting arguments on both sides. I think the keyword here is due process . If due process can be followed then this demolitions will serve for the betterment of the nation

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  3. Well, if the government were able to provide an alternative resettlement plan and compensation for the affected people it would be worth it. But things don’t really work that way in Nigeria, and the economy is already a hot mess so…. No. It’s not worth it. I honestly think the government has more pressing issues right now. The government should focus on diversifying the economy to produce enough revenue to pay off Nigeria’s debt, fight off boko haram, provide stable electricity and much more. After they’ve done all of that, then they can think about demolishing illegal structures.

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  4. After carefully weighing both side of the arguement the most reasonable option for me is to support demolition because for all the reason stated and even more . Action is required regardless of the number of occupants however i would suggest that the inhabitants be given ample warning and time .also if possible assistance to vacate the would be demolished structures

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  5. You can just be like “Great arguement! From a utililatrian point of view, demolishing the illegal structures would be of greater benefit for the entire society”

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  6. Demolition would be advised once a proper plan is made for the relocation of the inhabitants plus strengthening the institutions in charge to prevent any new construction of illegal structures. By doing so backlash from the society will be avoided and in 20-30 years time the problem will be history.

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  7. Demolition of these illegal structures might leed to another crises and instability in the country at this point in time. The best thing to do is to leave things the way they are right now and let them try to come up with a better solution on how to tackle this problem,Thank you…

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  8. Very educational!.. I found that reading this i already had a solution but then going further the writer explained the downside to the solution i thought about, however im going to to have to go against demolition. Destroying these settlements are going to create more problems than solutions, it will be best for the government to build better settlesments no matter the cost than to render thousands of pelple homeless as it cannot deal with the fallout, enough problems already plague the nation.

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  9. Indeed a good argument has been put up. But before removing them from their ‘homes’ make better homes for them, this way you are increasing human security in the country and reducing the level of frustration which then leads to aggression and thus preventing conflict!

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  10. The government and engineering planners must work together to see which buildings are effecting the Infrastructure in the long run. The procedure should be progressive and set in place via a treaty. The reason for this is that we know government parties may shy away from drastic action if it threatens their position in power during the general elections. Therefore setting a treaty would mean this work woild progress regardless of the party in power.

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  11. Demolition would be the best solution only if the government will provide alternative resettlement for the affected people.

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  12. Based on me i think illegal buildings should be demolished, in order to protect people from hazard and victims of the demolishion should be well compensated in order for it to be easy for them.

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  13. Demolition without making provision for the victims will definitely cause an uproar, if the government is serious about all the stated advantages then it is necessary they provide alternatives to ensure that the masses are well provided for and to ensure peace and unity between the public and the government

    This is a practice in developed areas for example in the UK… as little as making noise due to heavy eqiupments during construction or any form of disturbance in a residential area the government go to the extent of putting all the affected persons in hotel until the job is done…this is what it means to respect you wards…

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  14. This is an occurrence in both developing countries and developed countries although to different degrees. it will be worth an attempt to research how different nations have attempted to tackle this problem and challenges they faced. This is a compounded issue with many challenges already mentioned and some that can not be anticipated until it happens.
    The need to fix such an issue should be tied into a long term development model for the country. There usually is a lot of bureaucracy that occur when trying to go the legal route to get permit to build, corruption tends to come into the mix in situations where ‘fees’ that are bribes are required to process and release applications. Factors like these tend to discourage people especially poorer ones from going the right path. Some of it boils down to education and a lot of people may not be aware that they need to do certain things to legally occupy a land.
    Addressing such an issue and trying to mitigate some of the potential problems like homelessness, crimes will be very complex and need participation from different stake holders, authorities and public. If it is determined that these structures must be taken down then we need to develop new real estate/property policies/models that can be enforced and maintained. It should be treated as an opportunity for more sustainable long term solutions.

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    1. Good point, however when we consider a state like Nigeria, not all the ares have a planned structure, and the structures aren’t updated. so you endup with a city plan from the 1990s were telephone cables are put into consideration and telecommunications fiber cables aren’t. And to think of the collateral damage, sometimes it’s much easier and cheaper rechannel electric high tension than to demolish dozens of houses.

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  15. These buildings are illegal and should be demolished. Demolishing them would help preserve lives on the long run as the buildings are hazardous to the occupants anyways. Also it would improve the the quality of the roads and traffic. The current occupants of these buildings also deserve compensation as the government and planning authorities should have proper laws and enforcement against it happening in the first place.

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  16. This is a complicated issue. It depends on how determined the government is in it’s deisre for a well organised city and how much it is ready to spend. Are the costs justifiable? Maybe. But what costs should be incurred? Monetatry compensation with access to alternative property to choose from could be an answer.
    Students could be moved to new premises over the weekend so that’s no issue.
    As mentioned in a previous comment, this has been dealt with in many other countries. It would be a good idea to look at what they did and the challenges they faced

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  17. The fact that the word ‘illegal’ is there then I think the government should do something about it. I will advise the affected people to be compensated though. As far as things like this are not taken seriously then we will continue to have illegal buildings flooding the cities. Nigeria needs development and to achieve that changes have to occur. So in summary it will be worth it only if those people will be compensated, because shelter is one of the most important things in any human life.

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  18. In as much as I want to look at this from the eye of the government – and I fully champion enforcement of law, something just doesn’t seem quiteright to me, that a person will use several months building a settlement and the government or law enforcement seem to be completely oblivious of this development, until when the building is almost completed (atimes even completed). Then the rules and regulations all of a sudden become apparent and the need for demolition arises. If a to-be settlement will be dismantled before being erected, I guess there will be less indignation from the both parties.
    To oppose Nazifa’s sound argument, it seems rather draconian to subjugate a person (mostly group of people), into such hardship and asperity in the name of “betterment for all”. Sometimes the alleged ‘danger’ is quite obscure and it’s infulence never arises let alone affect the antecedent. e.g demolition of a settlement because a park could be built there in the future. And let’s be dramatic a bit, how can rendering a group of people homeless and putting a park in place of their houses going to better the collective society?
    As addendum, we are talking of a country like Nigeria, as an emerging economy, can we really afford to dismantle people’s homes when we don’t give other remedies ? no transitional settlement no homeless support programs – whatsoever.

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  19. True…the buildings were illegally constructed but demolishing them doesn’t do much to tackle the concerns the Government has in most cases. I believe the Government could set up a special committee to do some reasearch and find out a lasting solution to the menace because demolitions only aggravates the problem.

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  20. I am totally for the demolition of illegal structures in the Federal Capital Territory, Abuja. The inability of past governments to enforce certain measures to check the construction of illegal structures has seriously distorted the implementation the Abuja masterplan leading to the emergence of slums all around the capital city.

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  21. With the amount of resources the country has if duely apportioned then the demolition and replacement of homes for the people should not be a problem as the health risk are at large and lives are more important than that, also as a developing country we should be able to learn from others, the environmental ministry should ask for assistance from other nations who have made similar decision if necessary and I’m sure we would be able to deal with such but looking at the situation it should be prioritised and it is indeed a necessity for those buildings to be demolished and the land be in full use for the benefit of all.

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  22. Demolition of illegal structures always has an adverse impact on the people but I believe it is a step forward for any developing country especially in the long run. The main issue is how the government plans adequate financial compensation in terms of resettlements and relocation of displaced people.

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  23. Demolition of illegal structures always has an adverse impact on people but i believe it is a step forward for any developing country in the long-run. The main issue is how the government plans adequate financial compensation in terms of resettlement and relocation of displaced people and how quickly they want to implement their development plans. Generally, it is a very good idea for the development of urban settlements.

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  24. I believe demolishing of the illegal structures is better because lives are gonna be safe, sickness is going to reduce as well ,also the drug trafficking is gonna reduce and it’s also a step forward for the people living in the area

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  25. It is really very sad that it has to come to choosing between a worse and worst situation because both have their set backs so I choose to look at it as slapping a plaster on a burst pipe and hoping and praying it stops leaking on time before a major disaster or calling a plumber to take the necessary measures the problem has already been made and now all we need is a solution and I say we should tear it all down and start again keeping let’s say a 100 people in a house then losing a 1000 people due to the problems caused by these buildings as seen in the above arguments can never ever be justified I say we should demolish these buildings and start again before we have a national tragedy in our hands

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  26. It is not out of place for Govt to demolish illegal structures. But while they do that, there should be a compensation plan for that so that the owners will not lost all. The setting up of illegal structure and unauthorised buildings like filling station sited within residential areas are too dangerous and harzadous and should be demolish. Illegal structures also attracts hudlums and makes the area unsafe for residence especially at night. Looking at these few reasons n many more from others here, it can be seen that the decision by Govt to demolish illegal structures is wise and therefore should be supported. But, while doing the demolition, adequate compensation plan should be set in place so they will not be at a total loss.

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  27. In topics like this I really don’t like to take side because there’re very liable points on both sides. Though the area of interest is Abuja but let’s pause a minute and look at the recent fire outbreak incidents that happened in Kano sabon gari market and in Kebbi market. Though the cause of the outbreak is still open for debate of another day the main reason why this outbreak last for about a week is due to the building structure and very very bad market planing (if there was any).After siting this above example I will really be okay with the situation where the government will demolish all the unplanned buildings ,restructure the city for the long term benefit rather staying and think of the immediate consequence which will later cause more life lost and epidemics.

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  28. As the article says, it is not black and white. But there is a master plan, and that in my opinion, supersedes everything. Therefore, it should be implemented

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  29. As the article says, it is not black and white. But there is a master plan, and that in my opinion, supersedes everything. Thereore, it should be implemented

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  30. Demolition of buildings is good I think because in order to develop we need to sacrifice somethings. Why will people build a house or shop very close to the road. Most people are not happy but it has to be done anyway, they are the ones who will benefit from it after it’s completed. This is the 21st century. Come on people should be more wise please. That is my opinion

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  31. This is a very interesting and rather, quite sensitive argument that touches the lives of the Nigerian people in general. The idea of demolishing buildings, and sometimes entire settlements, is something to be considered very carefully. This article has provided insights on the challenges faced by the government and by the citizens involved in this particularly difficult situation.

    One of the main concerns is the feeling of despair when a father uses up all his live savings to build a house for his family, only for it to be destroyed 6 months later. It is the feeling of hopelessness when a businesswoman sees her shop destroyed, leaving her no other means to send her children to school. It is the fury felt by these good people, when the government refuses to give them proper compensation for what they had just lost, how do they cope? Their lives are important.

    What is also important is that the country needs to grow. Older generations are replaced by newer generations and so should older buildings be replaced by newer ones. Without the right vision, it is impossible for a nation to grow, and that is why we are here in the first place. It is because past leaders have failed to plan for the future that we are struggling profoundly right now. It is because they did not envision a society for the future, that there seems to be no order in society today. It is because they did not build for the future, that they now have to demolish buildings to accommodate new ones in the first place.

    In order to tackle this fundamental problem, I believe we need to look at the situation we have right now and accept it. It is not the time to complain that the laws are not working. It is not the time to complain that a house is illegally placed. It is not the time to complain that there is not enough funds to go around for compensation to the people that have lost their homes. I believe this is a time to sit down and map a plan to the future, think of what we need to do to get there, think of what sacrifices to make to get there, and execute these plans with the belief that our lives will be better at the very end. This can only happen if there are compromises from both the government and the people.

    For example, it is said that the government should compensate the people, and that sounds fair. One can now ask two questions. First, if the state wants to grow, can they afford to keep the illegal buildings? Second, can they afford to give enough compensation to every single person given the structure of the state budget? If both answers are negative, what should they do then? They certainly cannot afford to keep buildings that prevent the prosperity of the society on the long run, neither can they afford to keep their people unhappy.

    This is why I believe a compromise is needed that will not only put the state on a path to growth, but to do so with a strategy that keeps the best interests of its people at heart. How can this be done? A compromise on the part of the state might come in the following way; it is true that these buildings are illegal? Why exactly are they illegal? Perhaps the state can soften some laws in such a way that a fraction of these buildings get taken down, instead of all. This fraction could be chosen so that the compensation costs will not be as high, and will also give the government room to start implementing their growth plan. With time, they could take down more and more buildings in the same fashion.

    From the part of the citizen, they will need to understand that by staying there, they are doing a disservice to the future of their own children. Staying there will not ensure that their children have jobs, but the institution that are to be built there will. Those that can afford to evacuate immediately will be compensated by the government, becoming the fraction that will initially leave the settlement. Those that will need time to leave will be given a realistic time frame to prepare, after which the government will give them a compensation that could be less than what was given to the people that left early. The earlier you leave, the higher your compensation. This can be a solution that will not only give time if they need it, but will also ensure that they leave as early as possible.

    Another factor pointed out by Olisa Ezeh is the fact that following the legal process needed to build in the state can be problematic for the common man. While it is a good idea to educate the common man of the law, it is also important to find subtle ways to enforce the law. One way to ensure that people build within legal boundaries is to perhaps prosecute any firm or organization that builds without having proof of the necessary permits required. This way, citizens stand no chance of bypassing the law given than it will be difficult for any firm to actually build for them if they do not have the papers needed.

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  32. Progress requires sacrifice. If only prior to tearing down these illegal infrastructures, new schools and new homes or land be provided first then the displacement could be less severe that may be one tough with limited land or finance. There is no point in pointing fingers or looking back it will only be a waste of our attention a good and enforcing administration usually does it right eventually. While the world eagerly awaits for the new Nigeria, there is much fight within the country that we foresee.

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  33. If an illegal structure is in an area that poses danger to human life, I think it would be wise and logical to bring it down. Human life has to be preserved as much as possible. If the area where an illegal building(s) is located does not in any way put the lives of people at risk, there should be a way of making these structures legal. There may be cases were the illegal structures may not necessarily be in risky areas but the arrangement of buildings does not follow an orderly pattern, they must be brought down. On the issue of compensation, that is the biggest challenge not only in Nigeria but across many African countries. But that’s not the problem. The real problem is corruption in many local councils and bodies that deal with land administration. If governments took greater strides in making land administration efficient and corrupt-free (as much as possible), we would have fewer illegal structures, fewer demolitions and the challenge of compensation would be dealt with. In my opinion, the real problem is ineffective land administration. Dealing with it is closing the tap and not just moping the floor. I thank you.

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  34. I believe this is far too much of a complex situation for a right or wrong answer. Having read some of the opinions above, I do not think you can just say ‘demolish illegal buildings’ because that is no solution. The blog covers some of the serious consequences that this action may have – and as terrorism and other crimes are perhaps already high in those areas, simply demolishing the houses of people will result in a sharp increase of those crimes. I agree with the ideology behind a comment above – to create homes for the people you will make homeless through demolishment. Find areas for those businesses o relocate before you put them out of shelter. But yes, the government and other stakeholders must rectify their wrong doings and sign an agreement not to build on illegal land in the future. In countries like Nigeria, India and other developing countries, it is easy to give opinions and say “this is wrong/unethical”, but to come up with real suggestions and plan of actions, is hard.

    Therefore, I would like to conclude by saying – great article guys! More issues like these should be brought to light and as the new generation with new ideas and understanding, we should collectively tackle these issues through finding viable solutions together. This will only be possible if we try to understand the sensitively of the dilemma, and understand that one answer cannot be applied to all countries/cultures etc.

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  35. I don’t want to sound too rigid,but I believe the benefits of demolishing those illegal structures cannot be over emphasized. Laws are meant to be followed. Nigerians must learn to adhere to all rules and regulations of the land in order to move forward. Compensating defaulters depends on available resources.

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  36. As someone who has lived the better part of their life in the city of Abuja, seeing that there really is a master plan and it not being implemented makes me somewhat uneasy. Nigeria hosts over 150 million individuals and Abuja as a city has the capability of becoming a megapolis, our very own Tokyo or New York if I may say. It may be black and white the issues surrounding the development of the city but it’s almost very logical, you can’t be building a tower with a stack of cards and decide to add in for instance a stone brick and not expect that tower to crumble under the weight. Because that is exactly what these illegal buildings are doing, under a state where zoning laws are not being followed due to corruption practices individuals will feel that they deserve a right in the way Abuja as a city should become and unfortunately so far that has been more of an eyesore than anything beautiful.
    Do I advocate the removal of illegal buildings for a better Abuja master plan, Yes, do I advocate it being done in an inhumane way with no sense of resettlement or compensation, No. But if the grand plan of a city like Abuja is to be realised logic must take precedence over emotional jargon.

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  37. Demolition is the way forward for the city of Abuja. The structure are illegal so by law there shouldn’t be any building there. Those against made some very good points that most of them become homeless. But leaving them there would lead to loss of life and more sick people in the society due to the hazardous condition of the environment they leave. Government have provided resettlement homes for this people but they end up selling them eg. Apo resettlement.

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  38. This article has brought all the issues wrong with the planning of the FCT to light. Like you put down in the article, the root cause of these illegal structures is from the poor planning of our authorities and their negligence. Sometimes it is not that some of these structures were erected without the knowledge of the authorities. I mean you easily find someone in a top position being bribed to provide necessary documentation to build in these areas. There is an actual plan for the city but mostly the pan has not being implemented as a result we have buildings and businesses here and there where they don’t belong. In other for the plan to be implemented those structure will have to be scrapped and the cost of this demolition exercise is homelessness, loss of business and in other cases loss of lives. Some of these businesses are petty businesses, with the high unemployment rate in Nigeria; these businesses are mere substitutes for unemployed individuals to provide a living for them and their families. This is the price that has to be paid but then in the long run it is for the better development of the city and the people which makes it all worth it at the end.

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  39. It is good to consider as a government those who desperately need shelter and provide them with the basics as any good government would do in any part of the world. The problem however is, only few things can ever go exactly as we plan them. Meaning that no matter what happens, some people will always fall victims of circumstances. The government could be Merciful but the Law should not because that’s what makes a country. No Law should be taken for granted in the name of Being strong head, Religion, Poverty or otherwise. Once a Law is violated by building structures indiscriminately, then action needs to be taken but only when the government has done it’s part since the Law is a neutral writeup.

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  40. Illegal structures should be demolished, because they constitute a threat to public health and public interest. There are consequences of demolition, but the primary responsiblity of any government is the protection of ives and property of her citizenry.

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  41. Well this is really interesting,I felt deeply in pain when ever I saw anyone on the street with no place to sleep,rather hide or squat with the goats and sheeps at the road side or in a motor park,Even if we are in colonial ruled the provision of good shelter or compensation to the victims whose homes and business are been demolished is most,but we are in democracy where we the poors build up the Federal Government/State Government by our votes,any demolition for development should have a good judgement between the government and the Victim,I visited a place close or around FCT called GWAGWA most of the people there are been Affected by the demolition process,they are just dispose like dump,they feed and sleep in an unpleasant and dirty enviroment or I can say a very good/ favourable enviroment for bacterial growth,this kind of Negligent happen in the state goverment too where by the poor will be having house or shop and the government with power decide a road contruction,that count his house or shop among the demolition Area.at first they will promise paying him well but atlast they will pay him a sum of money that can not help him start a new a life with a good home.that’s is if the victim is poor!but when the victim is part of the government they quickly pay him well even with bonuses.I call on the FG/State goverment to treat both poor and rich as one,and any demolition should be paid well as promised that’s development,if the country/FCT is well build with starving and suffering people I guess that’s not development

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  42. Well all is said. In order to the right thing, hard decisions must be taken If and only If the end will justify the means… I believe that demolition of illegal buildings doesn’t mean putting the victims in a state of trauma, rather it will open a way forward to enable the wellbeing of the inhabitants of that community enjoy what all the capital territories across the globe are having. To illustrate , If to say Abuja is channelled with good transportation network such as electric train and so, life would become easier than it’s now over there. To sum up, I fully support the motion as far as the victims will be fully compensated… That’s ma opinion.

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  43. You don’t evacuate a people from a settlement without prior arrangements for resettling them. Paying compensations is only a catalyst for corruption. You find a place, build and estate or serviced layout… Allocate these properties to them accordingly, monitor their movement and make sure they have moved at least 80-90% … Then you can demolish the inappropriate settlement. Shelter is key!

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  44. You, yourself acknowledge and classified the building as illegal structures and blame the necessary authorities that means by default the structures are due to demolishion but before doing that, as a government u need to consider your people feelings. Cox intially the government are the cause of the mess (lack of proper Admintrative work) so the folowing measure are considered
    1. engage them in a town hall meeting and hear their views on such matter after giving a listening ears which i know majority will disagree cox the dont know the impact of what u trying to do.

    2. Provide refrences to them and make them see the advantage of what you doing

    3. Before going into demolishing their structures make sure u provide alternatives house and shops

    4. people like to been carried along . negotiate with them on what to give out as compensation after u already carried ur own survey so that u will not be cut unaware of anything.

    5. The government should involve Necessary agencies to avoid complete demolishing in a large area occupied by poor or average Nigerians

    6. Demolishing should occur as a priority not a selfish gain for either building a mole or filling station

    7. Lastly necessary agencies should create awareness on the importance and flexiblity of having a plan environment before thinking of demolishing peoples homes and shops cox onething i notice about Nigerians is that, the hate suprise and such wil lead to some of the negative crime you mention.

    N.B Do you know that majority of nigeria criminals live in such places that is not properly plan?

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  45. Very interesting story!looking at it in all aspect, demolition of buildings by d government without necessary arrangement,will brings problems n pain 2 d people,this issue govt must treats it wit much better ways dat will please the parties,find oda alternative for them if demolition will be d best option

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  46. To oversee the countries infrastructural development,demolition is necessary and the countries master plan must be duly followed.

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  47. To oversee the countries infrastructural development,demolition is necessary and the countries master plan must be duly followed.

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  48. As far as due process is concerned, demolition would be the best thing to do. For a city to be fully developed illegal buildings need to be abolished. Thus, for the betterment of over 2 million people living in Abuja a bold decision has to be taken without seeing the plight of rich and the poor.

    Since both public and planning agencies are to be blamed for the illegal structures, people should be enlightened about the dangers of their illegitimate premises to inhabitants and the negative impact on national economy. Then, prior to demolition government should make urgent provision of new places or any other possible solution. This would create more room for development to the city and make people live in peace and tranquility.

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